FREE EBOOK

Team Good Code

Engineering software is a team effort. Professional developers need to work with others, sometimes in huge teams with hundreds of contributors. Writing good code means writing code that’s easy and safe for your team to read, modify, and rely on. In this free mini ebook, you’ll learn amazing practices for working in a software team directly from a team leader at Google.

In Team Good Code, author and Google mentor Tom Long shares two chapters from his bestselling book Good Code, Bad Code to help coders become more effective team members. This free mini eBook explores how other engineers will interact with your code, and highlights how you can avoid ambiguity, misleading code, and buggy software. You’ll learn how to ensure your code is difficult to misuse, which will decrease the likelihood of bugs. Start making the shift from lone-coder to valuable, effective software team member with this fast, fabulous — and free! — mini ebook.

Check out Manning’s other free mini-eBooks here: https://freecontent.manning.com/free-ebooks-from-manning/

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